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N. Warren Town and County News
Norwalk, Iowa
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February 25, 2010     N. Warren Town and County News
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February 25, 2010
 

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OFFICIAL NEWSPAPER FOR AND NORWALK COMMUNITY SCHOOL DISTRICT 121212 MIXED ADO 500 SMAI_ L [ OWN~JAPE RS +~c C~LIFORNIA AVE SW SEAT I-LE WA 98.136-1208 I1,1,,I,,I .... II,,ll,,ll ..... II,,hlll,,,I,,I,,,I,l,ll,,,i,,ll ˘ %#ol. 41 No. 40 Norwalk, Iowa 50211 USPS No. 395-120 Phone 981-0406 Thursday, February 25, 2010 OVIATT ELEMENTARY By Dr. Laura Sivadge Preschool-lst Grade Principal and Rodney Martinez 2nd-3rd Grade Principal m Planning for the Worst, but Hoping for the Best You never know if your home will ever be threat- ened by fire, weather, or other disasters. In addition, who knows if you will ever get separated from your children in a crowd? To be prepared, it is vital that you and your children know exactly what to do in emer- gency situations and have the plans in place to react quickly and calmly if something serious happens. Play it by the numbers. Even preschoolers can learn to dial 911 - although it is essential that children know to only dial it in cases of emergency. Children also need to have access to home, cell and work numbers for parents, caregivers and trusted neighbors. Post a list in your kitchen where they can see it. Give copies to their teachers and school, childcare providers and other emergency contacts. Plan it out. Create and rehearse your family's escape plan to be used in case of a fire or other home emergency. Make a game of practicing exactly what to do, timing your chil- dren to see who follows the plan and gets out safely fastest. Be sure to include a secondary plan in case the first exit is blocked or unsafe. Have the right supplies. One of the best "be prepared" lists is available through the U.S. Department of Homeland Security's Website: www.ready.gov. In addition to checklists for adults, the site includes terrific, non-threatening games for children to play to learn what to do in case of emer- genc); like an emergency supply kit scavenger hunt. Your local Red Cross and fire departments also can be great emergency-planning resources. Check your equipment. Make sure your home's smoke detectors are always in working order and that your fire extinguishers have not passed their expiration date and are easily acces- sible. Get drop-down window ladders if your apartment or bedrooms are not on the first floor. Who to trust? Children can get separated from their families at any time - at a big public event, in a crowded store, or on a family outing. Teach them to stay where they are and not to go wandering off to try to find you. Little ones should be taught to just have a seat on the ground and start calling out, as loud as they can, "Mommy" or "Daddy" - or whatever they call you. If they are sepa- rated from you for a long period of time, tell them they should inform a safe adult - a mother with children, a police officer, or a security guard - that they are lost. A snapshot could be a lifesaver. Keep a current picture of each of your children with you at all times. Not only will the photos bring a smile to your face, they could be essential to helping locate your child quickly if you get separated. Memorize the essentials. Even young preschoolers can learn their first and last names and kindergarteners should have memorized both their address and their parents" full names before their first day of school. Be aware of the school's plans. Every school should have an emergency plan in place~ Ask to see a copy, Make sure that they rehearse emer- gency response situations with students - from fire drills to tornado or hurricane plans. NORWALK WRESTLERS AT STATE TOURNAMENT Three wrestlers repre- sented Norwalk High School at the State Wres- tling meet held at Wells Fargo Arena February 17- 20: Freshman Evan Reynolds, 103 lbs; Senior Kyle Coates, 125 lbs and Senior Tyler Thompson, Hwt. Action for the War- riors began Wednesday night. Reynolds set the standard for the Warriors when he met Jake Gotto from Epworth Western Dubuque and won by a pin in the first period. Coates followed shortly aiTter and met the defend- ing State Champion John Meeks from Roosevelt. Coates was defeated by a major decision, 23-9. Meeks went on to defend his championship when he defeated Adam Perrin from North Scott in the fi- nals Saturday night. Th- ompson wrestled aggres- sively against 6"6" Josh McDonald from Cedar Rapids-Xavier and won with a pin in the second period. In the wrestle backs on Wednesday night, Coates defeated Parker Sturges from Ma- son City and won, 16-4. This was a big win for Coates as Sturges had beaten Coates in January at the Mason City duals. Day two at the Wells Fargo Aret'la eld more exciting action for the wrestling Warriors. Reynolds met up with Urbandale's Colby Knight. Knight major decisioned Reynolds, 13-2. But Reynolds wasn't done! He had his sights set on the medal stand and came back and pinned Sam Jameson from Glenwood to keep his medal hopes alive. Coates wrestled Luke Kremer from Cedar Rapids-Kennedy and was defeated, 12-5. Coates de- scribed wrestling at the state tournament as a "memory of a lifetime." Thompson faced Andrew Lamb from North Hoover in the quarterfinals .Thurs- day night. Thompson pinned Lamb in the sec- ond period to stay unde- feated in the tournament Tyler Thompson, second from fight, placed fifth in the Hwt. class. Norwalk Warrior Evan Reynolds, pictured far left, placed eighth in the 103 class at the 2010 IHSAA State Wrestling meet. Photos submitted. medal stand. Birnb ium defeated pounder had a seasonthat Friday afternoon was Reynolds in the third most freshmen only dream the semi-finals and third round consolation whichof, leaving the Well with round consolation round, put Reynolds in the the 3A eighth place medal Thompson faced #1 bracket to finish with a around his neck. Thomp- ranked Brody Berrie from seventh or eighth placeson met up with junior Bettendorf. The winner of medal around his neck. Connor Herman from Ce- this match would advance Thompson was defeated 3- dar Rapids-Jefferson. After to the finals on Saturday 0 in the consolation round a first period takedown night. Berrie defeated Th- by Joe Scanlan from attempt by Thompson was ompson in a hard-foughtJohnston. This loss putunsuccessful, Herman match, 8-2. Thompson Thompson in the fifth/ leading l-0 with an escape then fell to the bottom side sixth place bracket, in the second period of the bracket and was Saturday afternoon walked into a Thompson guaranteed sixth place, but Reynolds and Thompson headlock which threw could wrestle his way all wrestled for their State Herman to his back, Th- the way to third place,medals. Reynolds met upompson secured the fifth Berrie went on to win the with Drake Swarm from place medal with a pin. Championship of the 3A Bettendorf and was Senior Thompson de- Hwt. class, pinned in the Second pe- scribed the experience as • Geiccludedp. 5 ,andsecurehisplace°nthe', Fridz/y evenirlg Matt' ri0d. The freshrha ; 03- ........