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Newspaper Archive of
N. Warren Town and County News
Norwalk, Iowa
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May 24, 2012     N. Warren Town and County News
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May 24, 2012
 

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Thursday, May 24, 2012 N/Warren Town and County News Page Nine "Annie" the Musical -Norwalk middle'school 7th and 8th choirs had suc- cessful performances of the musical, "Annie," Fri- day, May 11. The drama team worked diligently daily at 7:10 every morn- ing for six weeks learning SCHOOL AND SPORTS PAGES SPONSORED BY: Photos submitted. lines to make their charac- ter come alive. The cast was a smash hit when en- tering the stage bringing *WENDY BORST MASSAGE, LMT 240-1075 *COMMUNITY BANK 285-4900 *FOUR SEASONS AUTO WASH 981-4454 *DR. DONNA GRANT FAMILY DENTISTRY 256-9000 *HASKIN CHIROPRACTIC CLINIC 981-0556 *JJ DESIGNS custom embroidery/screen print 953-6306 MyJJDesigns.com *EDWARD JONES INVESTMENTS Kevin Pearson - 285-1838 *NORWALK INSURANCE SERVICES 981-0434 or 981-4293 *NORWALK LIONS CLUB 981-0432 *OPTOMETRIC ASSOCIATES 981-0224 *SCOTT'S FOODS 981-0606 *NEWTON STANDRIDGE STANDRIDGE GROUP 229-5310 *N/WARREN TOWN &COUNTY NEWS 981-0406 OVIATT ELEMENTARY By Dr. Laura Sivadge, Principal and Rodney Martinez, Dean of Students the audience out of their seats with an exciting standing ovation. Lori Nielsen directed the play with Gerard Krupke as- sisting teaching choreog- raphy to the choir. Jenni- fer Schaff accompanied the musical on keyboard. Lori and Nick Nielsen; Josh Butler, Sam Bergan and Jordan Ford created the set. The sound technicians were Sebastian and Steve Capp. Annie Cast: Annie-Allie Heckhart, Molly-Lizzy Roush, Pepper-Jory Nelson, Duffy-Kennedy Ellis, Kate- Miranda Pomeroy, Tessie- Hannah Broadbent, July- Emily Clark, Oliver War- bucks-Zach Cook, Miss Hannigan-Naomi Safford, Bert Healy-Tanner Leiting. Lily St. Regis-Meghan Zug, Rooster Hannigan- Layne LeQuatte, Franklin D. Roosevelt-Tyler Ray- mond, Louis Howe (Roos- evelt's Assistant)-Nate Aveni, Grace Farrell- Alyssa Hensley, Bundles- Ethan Saltz, Apple Seller- Dakota Bright, Dog- catcher-Ryan Hensley, Sandy-Josh Greenwood, Lt. Ward-Nate Aveni, Po- liceman-Michael Geistler, Drake-Sammy Hansen, Cecille (servant)-Maddie Ralston, Mrs. Greer (housekeeper)-MaKenna Ludlow, Usherette(NYC song)-Brandi Amantea, Radio Announcer-Me- linda Klawonn, Drama Di- rector-Rachel Taylor and Mariah Cook, Prop help- ers backstage-Julianna Huegerich, Cindi Thron- son and Sydney Lundberg, Drums-Rachel Crady. Sports and Sportsmanship Children's sport should be fun, fulfilling and teach good sportsmanship. SometimeS, however, comletitive and assertive adults can undermine these goals and ruin the child's experience. The key is to make sure every- one involved is supportive of the child and practices good sportsmanship. Here are some tips: Let children choose. Make sure that your child chooses which sports to try. Parents can unknowingly pressure their children to live up t o their athletic dreams or accomplishments. Encourage variety. Getting too wrapped up in a single sport at a young age may lead to emotional and physical problems as your children grow. Also, parents who have invested a lot of time and money in one sport may prevent their,children from trying something new. A better idea is to try a variety of sports and see what "clicks"--all the while knowing that your child's inter- ests may change. Look for the right fit. Take extra time matching your child with the right team and league. For younger chil- dren, focus on leagues that emphasize gaining skills rather than competition. As your child progresses, he or she may want to register for leagues that are more competitive. The coach is key. Do your homework when it is time to match your child with a coach by talking to other parents and children. Concentrate on how the coach makes the children feel, how much they are learning and how much fun" they are having, instead of on the win-loss record. Keep disappointment to yourself. Every child feels down when they he or she has a bad day on the field or court. Do not let them feel they have disappointed you. Remember that frustrated or disappointed children need you to be understanding and encouraging. Also, try to avoid making negative comments or even "helpful criti- cism" immediately following an event. Leave a little time so that everyone has a chance to get some perspective. Have the coach talk to parents who are over-the- top. There is often at least one parent who seems un- able to control his or her outbursts during games. Rather than handling it yourself, speak with the coach. Ask him or her to sit down and discuss how the negative actions make other parents and children feel. Tune out game time criticism. Teach children to tune out criticism while they are playing. Help them develop a mental shield, so that any taunting remarks from the audience bounce right off them. Penalize unsportsmanlike conduct. As in many sports, there is a penalty for unsportsmanlike behavior. Make sure your children know that your family has a policy as well. Never.allow your children to get away with name-calling, dirty play, cheating, or acting out. Have firm rules in place and enforce them. If the bad behavior persists, pull your child from the team. Finally, do not push your child. It would be amazing if your child became an Olympic star or professional athlete. But remember that the chances of that occurring are slim, even for children who excel at a young age. Encourage their ambition, but understand that the main reasons to get involved in sports are to learn teamwork, have fun, get fit and make friends. I like handling newborn animals. Fallen into life from an unmappable world, they are the ultimate immigrants, full of wonder and confusion. -Diane Ackerman